Millions Plan to Flee to Europe From Afghanistan and Marburg Virus Infected Guinea

MARBURG - Germany - Due to events in Afghanistan and Guinea, the EU is set to receive millions of refugees soon.

Europe is set to receive millions more refugees, not only from Taliban ruled Afghanistan but deadly virus torn West African country Guinea.

The corridor for entry to the EU is mostly from North Africa, but the entry zone of Greece is also a preferred route by millions of migrants fleeing oppressive regimes and disease.

The Marburg virus which makes people bleed to death internally, and comes from bats/monkeys, is now a major concern by the UN, who are trying to stem the flow of infections in Guinea.

There is no known treatment for the Marburg virus. Africans eat bats as part of their culture and diet.

Health authorities in the country are now monitoring 155 people who may have been in contact with a confirmed case, the World Health Organisation said.

The patient died in Gueckedou in southeastern Guinea – also the location of the 2014-16 West Africa Ebola outbreak.

All it would take is infected Africans to cross into Morocco or Libya and take a ship to Italy or Spain. The current rate of migrant ships into the EU is about 400 boats per day, and once within the Schengen zone, migrants are given automatic admittance to the EU. Flights from Guinea are regular and constant into mainland Europe and the UK, and other parts of the world, thus enabling the virus to spread.

The incubation time for the virus is between 2-21 days, therefore many travellers could easily spread the virus without showing any visible sign of illness.

Three million Afghans to Germany

The abandonment of Afghanistan by the U.S. as well as the huge move by the Taliban to take over eight cities and vast rural territory means millions of Afghans will be forced to migrate to Europe.

“It can be assumed that up to three million Afghans will be making their way to Europe in the foreseeable future. I always ask people: why don’t you go to Saudi Arabia, these are Muslims, this is your culture. The answer is always: no, Germany is better,” Sybille Schnehage, an aid worker in Kunduz, Afghanistan revealed in a recent interview.