What is Sports Science?

LONDON - England - For athletes of many sports, sports science is the core of their competitive ability to function at their prime, to win competitions.

sports science

Wherever professional sports men and women operate, there is a good chance that a sports science practitioner is nearby. Sports injuries can be bountiful in some athletic endeavours, especially in sports like gymnastics, and contact sports like football, and rugby.

The efficiency and technique of whatever sport the athlete is involved in does take a lot of science, not only in physicality, nutrition, but in mental attitude, therefore sports scientists are involved in many of the stages of development of any sports person. Physiology, psychology, anatomy, biomechanics, biochemistry, and biokinetics. Furthermore, sports online betting rely on sports science as a measure of competitive energy, and marker to who the winners and losers are in any given game.

The actual mechanics of human or non-human movement is called Kinesiology, which encompasses the dynamic principles of movement in all its forms, whether physiological, psychological dynamic and biomechanical. The strength and conditioning of sports men and women are very important factors to success in whatever sport is being practised, involving biomechanics, and orthopaedics, especially utilised in methods of rehabilitation from sports injuries with physical and occupational therapy.

Getting the most out of an athlete, or sports person is the ultimate goal of the sports scientist, and within this competitive field, the science is just as competitive.

Ensuring the full fitness of athletes is the principle of adaptation through exercise, conditioning the human body and the musculoskeletal system, improving neuromotor control, as well as the neuroplasticity of the brain. As aerobic exercise increases the cardiovascular system of the athlete, anaerobic exercises increase the muscular system, and therapeutic exercise increase the motor capabilities of the athlete through neuromotor control.

Each sport has its own type of exercises, and this can also vary from teams, and individual athletes. Professional golfers, footballers, and gymnasts all utilise different exercise regimes, kinesiological forms to perfect their sport, and improve their technique prescribed by their sports science practitioner.

Sports science, of course, does not have to cater solely for athletes and sports people, it is useful for everyone, and it is scientifically proven that certain exercises can be beneficial to all of us, to reduce depression, and to extend longevity of our bodies.

Sports science is always developing and innovating new areas of research into the human body, and evolving as a work in progress, that can benefit not only athletes but all humans.

Movements in the body, also affect the brain, and this part of sports science is called Neuroplasticity, because it analyses how changes in the brain occur from body movement.

The history of human sport science must of course begin with the ancient Greeks, the noted ancient Greek physician Galen (131–201) wrote 87 detailed essays about improving health, aerobic fitness, and strengthening muscles.

The Renaissance in Europe brought about new concepts, and anatomic studies which expounded on the simplistic Greek theorems, with much more detail and intricacy.

Today, sport scientists are delving into the minutest parts of the human physique, and also dealing with chemical reactions in the human body, the use of drugs, and even nanotechnology where the future is becoming a reality.

Maximising performance for any team, or athlete is the predominant concern, and as long as the competition never ceases, there will always be a need for sports science, to legally enhance the athlete’s ability to win.