Read Documents That Prove Turkey Granted Visa Free Travel After June 23

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ANKARA – Turkey – Leaked documents reveal that visa free access to Turkish citizens will most certainly occur after June 23 EU referendum.

 

 

 

Here is conclusive proof that the Prime Minister David Cameron is planning a visa deal with Turkey after June 23 EU referendum:

 

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In a telegram to the Foreign Office on May 5, Janet Douglas, the deputy head of mission in Ankara, called for Britain to let in thousands of Turkish citizens. She acknowledged that this ‘would be a risk’ but said it would be ‘a significant and symbolic gesture to Turkey’. Douglas warned that failure to help Turkey would lead to a backlash, saying ‘if visa liberalisation doesn’t happen, an impetuous and riled Erdogan – prone to come out fighting when he feels betrayed – could carry through his threat to ‘open the flood gates’ to Europe for migrants.

Europol has warned Theresa May that migration fuels terrorism.

The Commission has sought to keep the migration situation under control until after the referendum: Nick Pickard, the deputy head of mission in Berlin, said Angela Merkel’s Europe adviser Uwe Corsepius ‘was confident that the Commission, for their part, would avoid major escalation of tensions before the end of June’ quoting him as saying: ‘We can keep this under control.’

The British Government is preparing a memorandum of understanding on migration with Turkey.

The Government regards visa liberalisation for 1.8 million Kosovars as a ‘drop in the ocean’.

 

Despite David Cameron’s claims on Sunday, Turkey and four other countries are joining the EU, with his and the European Commission’s full support. David Cameron refused to veto Turkish accession or commit to hold a referendum.

David Cameron refused to veto Turkish accession or commit to hold a referendum. During his interview, David Cameron refused (1) to veto Turkish accession or (2) to hold a referendum. He simply claimed ‘it’s not going to happen’ and that ‘you cannot find an expert’ who thinks Turkey will join the EU. Clearly, he does not consider the Foreign and Commonwealth Office to be experts.

The accession process is being accelerated. On 4 May 2016, the European Commission announced that: ‘The accession process will be re-energised, with Chapter 33 to be opened… and preparatory work on the opening of other chapters to continue at an accelerated pace’.

David Cameron strongly supports this. In 2010, Cameron said he was ‘angry’ at the slow pace of Turkish accession, that he was the ‘strongest possible advocate for EU membership’ for Turkey, and that ‘I want us to pave the road from Ankara to Brussels’. In 2014, he said that: ‘In terms of Turkish membership of the EU, I very much support that. That’s a longstanding position of British foreign policy which I support’.

The Government admitted it supported Turkish accession last month. Last month, the Europe Minister, David Lidington, said: ‘The UK supports Turkey’s EU accession process.

The British public will not get a vote on the accession of Turkey to the EU. The European Union Act 2011 allows the Government to ratify EU accession treaties without a referendum. There was no referendum on the accession of Croatia to the EU in 2013 (European Union.

The Government opposes giving the British people a say. As the Minister for Europe, David Lidington, said in 2011: ‘A few years ago, 10 new member states joined the European Union at the same time. I believe that their combined population then was 73 million, which is slightly greater than Turkey’s population is now. I do not believe that anybody in this country argued at that time that a British referendum on those accessions was right’.

The UK is paying £2 billion to help Turkey, Albania, Macedonia, Montenegro and Serbia to join the EU. Turkey alone is set to receive over £1 billion of UK funds to help prepare it for membership.